Wednesday, April 2, 2014

In Thailand, A New Kind of Protest

Protesters put down placards and pick up pragmatism as they begin solving the problems created and/or neglected by the regime they oppose.

Tony Cartalucci
Land Destroyer Report

Since late October, 2013, protesters across Thailand have taken to the streets, occupied rally sites, seized government buildings and made their grievances known to the world. They stand in opposition of the regime of Thaksin Shinawatra - a Wall Street-backed billionaire autocrat, convicted criminal, accused mass murderer, and fugitive who is openly running the country from abroad via his nepotist appointed proxy, his sister, Yingluck Shinawatra.

Not entirely unlike other protests seen unfolding around the world, large mobilizations have periodically flooded the streets of Thailand's capital city of Bangkok, at times attracting over a million protesters.

Image: One protest leader, Buddha Issara, traded in placards for pragmatism, purchasing a rice mill and operating it at his rally site in northern Bangkok. The mill is processing rice from destitute, desperate farmers and creating an ad hoc farm-to-city market to put cash from consumers directly into the hands of farmers as opposed to the corrupt middlemen and regime warehouses overflowing with unsold, rancid rice. If Thailand's political future is decided by actions rather than words, anti-regime protesters like Buddha Issara and his followers are well on their way to victory. Others would be wise to follow his sage example not just in Thailand, but around the world. Find more images via ASTV's

However, unlike many protests, particularly those promoted heavily by the Western media, including the so-called "Arab Spring" and the recent "Euromaidan" protests in Ukraine later found out to have been led by Neo-Nazis and ultra-nationalist parties with Hitleresque names like the "Fatherland Party," hollow slogans such as "democracy" and "freedom" in Thailand are overshadowed by more specific, better articulated, and enumerated demands.